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Meko and Asbo two very unusual patients


Last week we had two raccoons as patients in the hospital in Morley

 

Meko and Asbo belong to Morley Exotic Animal Rescue, a local charity who rescue unusual pets when owners find themselves unable to take care of them anymore.  They currently house exotic birds, lizards, snakes, invertebrates, arachnids, meercats, skunks as well as Meko and Asbo, the raccoons.

 

Raccoons are adaptable, nocturnal animals that often live in urban environments in their native North America. They are great climbers and have slim, dexterous forepaws that aid agility. They also don’t mind a spot of swimming. Raccoons never journey further than is absolutely necessary, preferring to live within the demands of their appetites on a diet that includes urban waste and roadkill. (http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Raccoon)

 

Meko and Asbo are about 5 months old. Morley Exotics have had Meko since he was 3 weeks old but Asbo is a relatively new addition. They are very inquisitive and boisterous so they have a special purpose built enclosure. Raccoons are known to be very dexterous and are able to pick locks so you can imagine the challenges they prove.

 

Meko and Asbo were in hospital to be castrated, a procedure we know as more common in cats and dogs. Their carers decided to get them neutered because they are two males living together and hence it should help prevent any aggression between them. They also may go on to live in a bigger social group as well.

 

Tom Clarke, one of the Partners at Abbey House and surgeon for the procedures on Meko and Asbo said “I have to admit that I was initially unsure how to anaesthetise these unusual patients and had to seek advice from a colleague at the University of Edinburgh. Once we had established this it was all straight forward, very much like castrating a dog. We enjoyed having the raccoons in the practice both for the interest they engender in all the staff and the variety they offer to our veterinary surgeons.”

 

        

 


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